Archive for février, 2019

25 février 2019

The new norm in research will be about QUALITY NOT QUANTITY ! #PublishorPerish culture is harming academia! #Merton_norms to Make Academia Great Again ;)

In 1942, sociologist Robert Merton articulated an ethos of science in “A Note on Science and Technology in a Democratic Order.” He argued that, although no formal scientific code exists, the values and norms of modern science can nevertheless be inferred from scientists’ common practices and widely held attitudes. Merton discussed four idealized norms: Universalism, Communality, Disinterestedness, and Organized Skepticism. In this video, we explore what these norms are and what they mean for the scientific community. « A Note on Science and Technology » can be found at: http://www.collier.sts.vt.edu/5424/pd…

Merton, Robert K. 1973. The Sociology of Science: Theoretical and Empirical Investigations. University of Chicago Press.

Source: Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences (BITSS)

Publicités
20 février 2019

Humans Run Experiments, a Robot Writes the Paper

The future of automated scientific writing is upon us—and that’s a good thing.

In 2014, a researcher in France revealed a disturbing fact about the published scientific literature: At least 120 computer-generated manuscripts had made their way into academic conference proceedings, according to his analysis. Those robot-written papers, containing little more than strung-together buzzwords, had been created with a piece of software known as SCIgen, originally written on a lark by a trio of MIT graduate students in 2005. But in the years since, it seemed scientists had repurposed SCIgen to puff up their resumes and boost their professional status. This was understood to be a major scandal.

For Klemen Zupancic, though, the scandal was a source of inspiration. “It got us thinking,” the 32-year-old molecular biologist and tech entrepreneur told me this week from his office in Slovenia. Zupancic is head of sciNote, a tech startup that builds tools for helping scientists to switch from using pen-and-paper laboratory notebooks to more efficient online apps. (The company claims to have about 20,000 users, of which almost half are in the U.S.) When he read about the infiltration of academic journals by robo-generated text, he realized that the same approach might be used for honest ends. If software can publish scientific gobbledygook, then maybe it can write a valid scientific paper, too. So his company set out to create a program that would do just that.

more here 

15 février 2019

An Introduction to Jeffreys’s Bayes Factors With the SumStats Module in JASP: Part 1 | Bayes methods from: jasp-stats.org

In this blog post we elaborate on the ideas behind Harold Jeffreys’s Bayes factor and illustrate this test with the Summary Statistics module in JASP.

In a previous blog post we discussed the estimation problem, where the goal was to infer, from the observed data, the magnitude of the population effect. Before studying the size of an effect, however, we arguably first need to investigate whether an effect actually exists. Here we address the existence problem with a hypothesis test and we emphasize the difference between testing and estimation.

The outline of this blog post is as follows: Firstly, we discuss a hypothesis proposed in a recent study relating fungal infections to Alzheimer’s disease. This hypothesis is then operationalized within a statistical model, and we discuss Bayesian model learning in general, before we return to the Alzheimer’s example. This is followed by a comparison of the Bayes factor to other methods of inference, and the blog post concludes with a short summary.

More here

5 février 2019

A great blog to follow about the science crisis ! Replications, NHST paradgim, meta-reviews, editorial policy, academic retractations, publish or perish effects, etc … If you believe science has a huge problem and must change, then your are welcome!

“I am standing for this role because I believe that psychology faces one of two possible futures. In one, we fail to reform our research culture and diminish.”

— NeuroChambers: My manifesto as would-be editor of Psychological Science

 

http://scienceincrisis.info/